The Super Adventure Club: Gala Bingo Kingston

Categorised as ART., PHOTOGRAPHY.

The Super Adventure Club are photographers Oliver MooreLewis Watts and Simon Hawkins, who together document disused, derelict, hidden and other ‘off-limits’ structures. The aim is to view the world from other, often forbidden, perspectives.

We took a visit to the Bingo hall on a cold Saturday morning about midday, probably the most obvious of times. After scaling a wall, climbing under a make-shift wooden cover for a hole in the wall we were in. 

Once inside the true size of the building becomes clear and the detailed architecture is vast. The main hall area is a wide open space with light coming in from the roof. The once seating area, is now a collection of concrete steps and graffiti.

From the roof, you can see Kingston town centre and beyond. A great view, especially at night. From the outside, the building seems to be a disused forgotten space, with passers-by not giving it any form of recognition. It was operated as a cinema from the 1920s all the way up to 1976 when it was closed. It lay empty until the early 90s when Coral took over and started operating it as a Gala Bingo. The vibes you feel once inside are somewhat different, as the architecture, space and surroundings give you a sense of the atmosphere which was once present in the 30s.

More photography from the Super Adventure Club here.

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